0

1 iPad, 1 Task, 15 Ways

Recently my year 7 class were issued with an inquiry tasks asking them to select various pathways and answer various inquiry questions, many of which they themselves had created, relating to their current Inquiry topic of Ancient History with a focus on Ancient Rome and Ancient China.

I have embedded this task for you below.

Humanities Inquiry Task

Immediately after the task had been covered, discussed and picked apart, I set the students off to begin creating their presentations. Depending on what we are doing in class I often place a very heavy focus on ‘student voice, student choice’ (thanks @MichelleMeracis for allowing me to ‘borrow’ your phrase) as well as foster a ‘Gradual Release of Responsibility’ towards how work is presented. This essentially means that student can choose to create their work via just about any means they wish as long as they are meeting their success criteria and learning outcomes for that lesson.

After 15 mins or so I began conferencing with the students around the room what it is they had chosen to do and how they were going to go about presenting their work. The task itself involves also having students present their findings to the rest of the year seven cohort in an ‘exhibition’ style setting.

It became quickly apparent that the creativity I was hoping for was not entirely being embraced! A class conversation was quickly organised and a rushed ‘poll’ on NOT what each of the students were doing but HOW they were doing it. Their responses were mixed with a around half selecting to ditch their technology altogether. However, ¬†those who were iPad bound were all looking to create in the same select few app’s.

So being the teacher that I am I decided to show just a few select ways that were quick, pain free and simple to take what was a very ordinary task and ‘jazz’ it up a little!

Below I have completed the same basic task; under the ‘History Pathways‘ component, and the dot point titled ‘What are your thoughts/opinions on slavery?’. To answer this I have come up with three pretty standard opinions and attempted to represent these in 15 different ways using my iPad Mini. Some are extremely basic, others a little more complicated. Some tasks took a little longer to complete while others were completed in under 3 minutes.

Here we go!

# 1.

  • App: Pages
  • Cost: $12.99 however comes free with most recent model iPad devices.
  • Time: 3 minutes

Screen Shot 2014-07-06 at 8.27.08 pm

# 2.

  • App: KeyNote
  • Cost: $12.99 however comes free with most recent model iPad devices.
  • Time: 5 minutes

Screen Shot 2014-07-06 at 8.33.37 pm

Slavery KeyNote Preso!

# 3.

  • App: iMovie
  • Cost: $5.49 however comes free with most recent model iPad devices.
  • Time: 11 minutes (including export to YouTube)

# 4.

  • App: Haiku Deck
  • Cost: Free with in app purchases.
  • Time: 7 minutes (including upload time)

HISTORY PATHWAYS – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

# 5.

  • App: Adobe Voice
  • Cost: Free (An Adobe ID is needed, which is free.)
  • Time: 5 minutes (including upload time)

Screen Shot 2014-07-07 at 8.26.14 pm

 

Click on the image above to view the video…

# 6.

  • App: Pic Collage
  • Cost: Free with in app purchases.
  • Time: 5 minutes

photo

# 7.

  • App: Popplet LITE
  • Cost: Free, although a Pro Version is available.
  • Time: 4 minutes

screenshot

# 8.

  • App: Tellagami
  • Cost: Free with in app purchases.
  • Time: 3 minutes

# 9.

  • App: Video Scribe
  • Cost: $7.49
  • Time: 6 minutes (47min to export to camera roll!!!)

# 10.

  • App: Prezi
  • Cost: Free
  • Time: 7 minutes

# 11.

  • App: Google Doc
  • Cost: Free
  • Time: 3 minutes

Link to the EDITABLE document here: Slavery – History Pathway

# 12.

  • App: Survey Monkey
  • Cost: Free
  • Time: 6 minutes

Access the link to my created survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/M9GQ2SS

# 13.

  • App: Strip Design
  • Cost: $3.79
  • Time: 8 minutes

IMG_0862 IMG_0861

# 14.

  • App: iFunFace
  • Cost: Free with in app purchases
  • Time: 5 minutes

# 15.

  • App: Trading Cards
  • Cost: Free
  • Time: 5 minutes

tradingcard

 

And…. One more for good measure…

# 16.

  • App: Quick Voice Pro (embedded in to an iMovie and exported from an .MP3 to a .Mov)
  • Cost: $3.79
  • Time: 10 minutes

So there you have it… I do actually have ideas for another several however we’ll leave it at that! If you, the readers, have any ideas, I have embedded the Google Doc below so you can add your own ideas, apps, etc…

Your Ideas… ūüôā

 

1

Show & Tell

Show+and+Tell+Logo

I’ve been planning to write this post for the past few weeks however time has been getting away from me recently, how dare it, but alas, here it is! As mentioned in previous posts it’s been amazingly wonderful to be back in a classroom again teaching and learning with the squids! Working along side and relating to these young people during the week, on a consistent weekly basis, certainly has given me a new lease on my teaching life.

Now, do not get me wrong, I love my eLearning Director role, however, lately the drain that is constant meetings and administrivia has definitely weighed me down somewhat. So down to business. Below I have shared just a few of the things that I have been up to in my room. Mind you, I am in class 2 full days per week and am enjoying the Challenge of attempting to squash everything in to what is already a super crowded week but also making way for the ‘extras’ I am wanting to implement, both from a learning and classroom management perspective, such as a few of the items mentioned below! ūüôā

1. 2014 Middle Years (Yrs 5-8) Challenge Based Learning Unit: Digital Identity

2014 Middle Years CBL Unit: Digital Identity

2014 Middle Years CBL Unit: Digital Identity

We were wanting to run a unit, an introductory unit, for our Middle Years Students based on Cyber Safety, Digital Citizenship, Copyright, Creative Commons, and several other things! The challenge was not so much what to cover and when but how. Dare I say that covering the above topics with Middle Years students is a challenge relating specifically to engagement.

I wanted students to take ownership of their learning and drive what it is they want to know and hence what better way to do that than through a CBL, or Challenge Based Learning Unit. What I love about CBL is that students relate personally to their learning. They are drawing on real life experiences that effected them, either in a positive or negative way and can use these to guide new knowledge and understandings. Already I am seeing some excellent learning taking place via what has been created and shared with the students and facilitated by the staff.

The ‘proposal movie’ that was developed, under CC licensing rights, is embedded below. This movie was shown prior to our Middle Years Students undertaking this unit. The aim of this movie was to get students thinking about what having a ‘Digital Identity’ is and how this affects them as learners and users of technology in the 21st Century.

To assist the staff I developed an eBook, via Apple’s iBook Author Software, and has staff download this as a guide to assist them in running this unit. To develop this, I used Apple’s Own CBL Guide as well as several awesome resources that had been created by Adam Brice, an Apple Education Executive. If you would like to view the CBL Unit as well as the other accompanying documents such as the Assessment Rubric and Student Workbook, head to the shared DropBox Folder linked here: 2014 Middle Years CBL Unit Resources

2. Genius Hour Implementation.

I am not overly sure where I first caught wind of ‘Genius Hour, but I do recall being excited by the notion behind it! For those who have no real idea behind this, it all stemmed from Google giving their employee’s 20% time. This meaning 20% of their working week, which theoretically means one day, to work on projects which interest them as they please during this time. From this, Google Applications such as gMail, AdSense, Google News and Google Talk just to name a few.

In previous years we have implemented students undertaking ‘Passion Projects’ which is similar to the notion of Genius Hour however with fewer restrictions I guess you would say. The presentation below explains in simple detail what genius Hour is and this is what i showed to my students. Currently the students are working through the ‘finding out’ phase in answering their¬†Guiding or Driving Question.

Just a selection of some of the Guiding Questions my years 7’s have come up with so far;
  • How will I learn to create and mix my own DJ beats?
  • Why is their cruelty in the world? (Tough One… but I am interested to see where this leads!)
  • How should people react in a bushfire emergency? (I am hoping that a ‘how to’, or ‘what to do’ video stems from this!)
  • How can I make a iPad Game App, on my iPad?
  • How do violent video games affect the way people think?
  • What is the best way to help endangered animals and what can I do about it?

To inspire my chargers I then showed this great You Tube Clip starring Kid President, which my students loved!

3. Google Drive

Google Drive App

Google Drive App

The joys of Google Drive! This is more than likely not a big deal to most however, having spoken about, presented about, coordinated PL about and modelled and demonstrated about, the positiveness of Google Drive as an App to assist iPad Workflow has thus far been amazing. All teachers within our Yr 7 Team are now planning via Google Drive and sharing all planners, resources, links, PDF’s, etc via this means. The real power is now having students use this effectively to share work, receive work, and access learning materials needed not only via teachers, but also with each other. Collaboration is a major focus as part of our eLearning Capabilities and to now be entrenched in this with my own class is great.

The best part? It’s ease of use and set up!

Lastly, and as an add on to this, I have just discovered Kaizena, an online program that accesses your Google Drive Account and all your files. From here, you can highlight text on documents and leave Voice Comments. Something that I think will save teachers a lot of time in allowing them to give quick, effective and thorough feedback! View the clip below to see how all this works! ūüôā

4. Classroom Expectations.

I loathe classroom rules, not to be negative, but, I find them extremely negative, and more often than not against what a classroom should be about. In saying this, I believe there is a need for something to assist and guide students in demonstrating expected behaviours. The power from developing classroom expected behaviours is that these are student created and driven. If the ownership comes from the students then they are much more focused towards behaving in ways that are conducive to what a learning environment should be!

Below are the expectations that the students developed. Expectations which had to relate to at least one of our College’s values (Aiming High, Valuing Our Community, Respecting Others, Being Safe).¬†

For now. I think that’s all I will share as if this were a real show and tell session I would have been booted off the stage long ago!
0

Creativity and Learning!

This evening at our College’s latest ICT SIT (School Improvement Team) meeting we viewed Sir Ken’s 2006 TED talk on “How School’s Kill Creativity”. My colleague Michelle and I spoke about how there are some school settings out there giving their students 20% time, or ‘genius hour’ time to work on creative based projects of their choosing.

The notion of doing this is based on Google giving their employees 20% of their working week off, one day effectively, to work on company based projects of their choice that could add to Google’s offerings! A wonderful concept that fosters heavily on creativity and innovation. 2 things that we want our students to be aware of, and to attempt, as often as they can.

2 great local examples of this are from two fantastic teachers in Anthony Speranza and Narissa Leung, both educators in Melbourne. Their blog posts and online resources about what they are doing with their students is amazing and is certainly something I encourage not only our own staff to take up but are great for anyone wanting to ‘release’ their students to showcase what they are capable of!

What i really enjoyed reading was the way that both teachers went about integrating this and guidelines that they put in to place.This gave this idea I feel a greater purpose and meaning for the students as it guides their thinking to be more creative. This is evident in Narissa’s first project guideline where “Students had to learn something new while doing the project- it wasn‚Äôt enough to simply regurgitate information they already knew.”¬†

Reflecting on Sir Ken’s TED talk which i’ve seen several times now, he promotes a lot of thought provoking ideas and discussion points on the notion of innovation and creativity versus academic ability. The idea that the public education system does not cater for learners who have a need and drive for the creative. That schools are based on their academic success and results and it is this reason that our young learners grow to loose their creative ability.

As teachers and educators we need to ensure that we let all of our students have the chance to play to their strengths. That we do not simply rely on academic ability to judge how successful our students will be.

What do these 5 have in common…

  • Thomas Edison – Inventor
  • James Cameron – Director
  • Walt Disney – Animator
  • Mark Zuckerburg – Facebook Founder

and of course…

  • Steve Jobs – Apple Founder

They all are school dropouts. Oh, and all are known for their creativity and innovation in their respected fields.

The more we can encourage our students to be creative and showcase their skills and innovative capabilities the greater learning I feel we will see. By encouraging our students to think outside the box and move away from the norm is certainly something that needs to take place. The days of producing kids in the education system who are only academically driven are fast, if not already, becoming something of the past. Skills needed to be successful in the 21st century rely more not on reading, writing and numeracy, but on the ability for workers to be more technologically minded and globally connected.

The image below showcases 10 key skills and 6 key drivers our students will need by the year 2020. This has been developed by the ‘Institute for the Future‘ who have focused this work on future work skills, not future jobs. These skills being ones that are transferable across a range of jobs and work situations, all of which will aid workers to be successful in their chosen fields.

Click to Enlarge…

I seem to have gone off on some sort of tangent here however… there is a point! ūüėČ

That point being creativity needs to have a greater focus placed upon it in our education system and i feel that in most cases that the buck stops with the teacher. We need to step back, make room and space, and give our kids time to showcase and demonstrate what they can do, and the notion of ‘Genius Hour’ and or ‘20% Time’ is one great way in which we can assist in making the above happen.

For more information on what both Narissa and Anthony have been up to please head to their respective blogs.

Narissa’s Blog – Teaching in the Big Wired World and her post titled – ‘Putting the G in ‘Genius

Anthony’s Class Blog – Year 5/6 @ St.Marks Primary School¬†and his post titled ‘The Genius Hour!

Anthony’s Personal Blog – ReconfigurEd¬†If you scroll down you’ll find a number of posts related to his Genius Hour exploits as well as presentations that he has completed on this topic.
2

Slide2Learn 2012

Right. It’s now been a week, and a bit. Had plenty of time to reflect, so here we go.

Last Monday I had the pleasure of attending and presenting at the Slide2Learn Conference hosted at Albert Park College, Melbourne. S2L has been a conference that i have been aiming to attend for a few yeas now as it’s reputation is quite seeing that it is a conference ran by teachers, for teachers, as well as being¬†heavily¬†focused upon Apple Mac technology use in education. Fr more about Slide2Learn and its inner workings, head to the website HERE.

Now S2L was a two day conference and due to prior¬†family¬†commitments¬†i attended only the Monday, a which was filled with learning and engaging sessions for attendees to… attend.

Now, rather than give a minute by minute experience, which may bore some to the utter death, i thought i’d be a little more proactive in giving more detail about some of the excellent tools that i came across. These tools being one’s that could easily be embedded in to a Teaching and Learning program. Tool’s that i know i’ll be keen to use with my own students! Some of these may be new, others, perhaps not, so here we go… Thanks to Simon Shaw from Apple for these…¬†

1. Nearpod Application – iPad

Nearpod is an¬†application¬†that has been released only recently and allows some amazing things within a classroom to occur. Teachers can create a slideshow online via the Nearpod website. Nothing special. Yet. Teachers can embed in these¬†presentations¬†quizzes, videos, polls, sketching tools, and more. Still not impressed? From here, students have on their own iPad¬†devices¬†the “Nearpod Student App”, which allows them to view the created presentation on their own device, in real time with the teacher. So when the teacher swipes to the next slide, it will do so on the student devices. Now this can only happen if all devices are connected to a wifi network, however, 3G will also allow sharing to happen!¬†If creating and sharing slideshows is not your thing, then PDF documents can be uploaded, exported as a slideshow, and shared with students this way also.

All of the above can be a little better explained i suppose through the image below, sourced from the Nearpod Website.

All in all, and my VERY brief summary has not done it justice, Nearpod has a plethora of applications for classroom use. Head to the website for a much better description! www.nearpod.com

2. dotEPUB

dotEPUB allows users to embed a Widget/Bookmarklet in to their browser (Firefox and Chrome only) and then, once on a web page of interest, by clicking this installed button the text from that webpage is automatically converted to an e-book! A great way to share specific content that is web based with others. As a teacher, excellent resources can be created from this, such as converting a current event news story to an e-book and then sharing this with students. And, as the e-book can be read offline, great for students who have zero Internet access at home if the e-book or reading material is distributed at school.

3. TEDeD Talks

Most of us are familiar with TED Talks. Well, for those who may not know, we have now have TED-Ed Talks. This site focuses solely on educational based material that educators can use with students. Currently, at time of timing… there were 89 Videos that have been uploaded for use. Not much hey… HOWEVER! These videos have been ‘Flipped’ 4,740 times! Now what do i mean by flipped? Rather than me trying to explain it, i’ll TED do that… “Flipping” a video allows you to turn a video into a customized lesson that can be assigned to students or shared more widely. You can add context, questions, and follow-up suggestions to any video on TED-Ed or YouTube.”

Check the screen shot below for a snapshot of what each ‘flipped’ video can contain!

This amazing resource is well worth a look see!

4. Book Creator Application – iPad

When i first had a play with this it¬†reminded¬†me of the iBook Author software for my Mac. This is a great App for eBook creation right on the iPad itself. Now, there are other eBook creation type app’s for the iPad, yet i found this one to be easy to use, effective and most of all, student friendly. Create great eBooks in minutes, as i did at Slide2Learn! A very worthwhile app. Once created, students can read their eBook directly in iBooks, or email and share their creation with friends. The app gives a lot of features for students to be able to edit the content they include, which of course, is very important. Cost: $5.49…¬†App linked here.

5. Posterous – Online Sharing

Like a lot of online tools and sites, i had heard of Posterous, know of people using it, but never had a¬†chance¬†to see it in action properly. Now i have, and i can say i am glad i did. One of the first questions i am asked re: our 1:1 iPad Trial at my College is the whole sharing work of an iPad scenario… Connecting to a server? Printing work? Etc… Currently, we use email being a Google K-12 App’s College. This works great for us and our setting. We also ustilise Dropbox and using these extremely well also! In saying all of this, i have not yet had a chance to use, or play around with Posterous, yet from what i did see and have heard, it looks to be a winner. In my eyes anyway.

Posterous looks to be along the lines of a Dropbox type scenario, yet it also appears so much more! In a few words… students create an account. Then they have a ‘wall’ or space so to speak. Once they have created on their iPad device, they email it to their Posterous Space. Rather than displaying as a link or attachment, the actual document or file is displayed. How easy is that! How good is that! Spaces can be private, public, limited to a select few, etc… and this is a great thing about Posterous. I am excited to have a greater play with this to see if it would be a great fit for our students.

Lastly, Posterous supports a wide range of file types so the uploading/sharing of created content by students is a no brain-er. Posterous will also¬†automatically¬†re-size and convert image and video for optimum viewing via the Spaces that the dos’c are going to. Impressive.

So… I hope you find the above 5 tools useful. They may be great for you and your students, they may not, but definitely worth a share. Thanks to the Slide2Learn team and Simon Shaw from Apple for giving me a great insight in to these applications and tools!

 

0

Favourites (or, at least just a few of…)

Throughout the marvellous journey I have been on once i joined the Twitter fraternity, i have enjoyed, thoroughly, the many thousands of tweets that have been tweeted my way. To hear and often see what other educators are up to in their daily teaching lives has certainly open my own eyes to how i can improve my own practices.

To also have something so simple as Twitter be such an important and powerful resource, one which i now rely on frequently, at my disposal 24/7, is a great thing. To have created and developed a strong PLN, both locally and not, has been of great assistance to me, especially in my current role.

One thing that i gave found tricky with the whole Twitter thing is what to do with ALL of those great tweets and resources that come my way. Like many, i ‘favourite’ what i definitely want to come back to and occasionally even book mark items to my tool bar in Chrome directly. This has caused me a great deal of pain as my tool bar now has an utterly ridiculous amount of links associated with it, all of which has zero organisation!

So in my madness i have aimed to begin to collate what i have added as a ‘favourite’¬†over the years… and there’s a lot! If anyone out there in Twitter land, or somewhere else land, can assit me in the best way to orgainse these it’d be greatly appreciated!

Below i have included 20 links, yes, just the 20, that i’ve found to be of great value both in my owen role, as an educator, and as a coach!

Enjoy!

And a few extras…

 

11

GTA 2011!

Screen shot 2011-04-24 at 6.38.35 PM

Well. What an experience. An experience filled with such wonderful learning opportunities in so many various ways.

From my last post you may have gotten the hint that i was somewhat ecstatic at being selected to attend the Google Teacher Academy for 2011. The fact also that it was the first GTA of 10 so far, being held in Australia, and the second to be held outside of the U.S. made it all the more special.

For those who are unaware of what the Google Teacher Academy is, in a nutshell, it’s an opportunity for educators to be involved in a wonderful learning experience relating to al things Google and how all these things… ‘Google’, can assist teaching and learning. Both on a personal and whole School/College level. Those who attend the GTA then become GTC’s, or Google Certified Teachers. The Mission statement of the GTA summons this up very well:

Screen shot 2011-04-24 at 6.53.07 PM

At the beginning of the day, and also prior, (actually we were warned, several times) warned that we needed to be ready to be hit full on, with a day in which we would be covering a massive amount of content. Hit we were! The day was¬†jam-packed¬†full, covering all of the major Google tools and resources with a group of dedicated ‘Lead Learners’ (Google Certified Teachers who had obviously outstanding content knowledge of the Google Tools and Resources and who were also wonderful people to meet and get to know!) The 54 participants (most whom are located below in this great photo),

Screen shot 2011-04-22 at 10.56.23 AM

whom had been selected to attend GTA 2011, and this gave each and every single person in attendance the chance to meet, network and collaborate, which was extremely powerful! You can see from the map below just where all 54 members had travelled from!

Screen shot 2011-04-24 at 6.59.57 PM

The whole day was planned with intent and purpose in with the GTA Team it’s Mission Statement (above) with flying colours. The talk and chatter that¬†occurred¬†throughout the day was¬†phenomenal. Interactions between people who’d never met, people who had only met via a PLN such as Twitter, and those who’d actually met was outstanding. To see all these great educators collaborating with the tools they had been shown to them¬†truly¬†was a credit to the day and the leaders involved.

Here is just a few of the things that we covered throughout the day and as i said, just a few… ūüėČ

  • Google Apps: Education Edition
  • Google Books
  • Google Calendar
  • Google Docs
  • Google Earth
  • Gmail
  • Google Maps
  • Google Mobile
  • Google News
  • Google Reader
  • Google¬†Search
  • Google Sites

It was however the first activity that we had to complete for the day that¬†really¬†made me think about my own teaching, my own personal learning journey, and education and teaching in general. The activity was named, aptly…

Screen shot 2011-04-24 at 7.09.43 PM

For this great activity we were asked to “Think of the best example of innovation in education that you can”… The catch (as there always is…) the innovation that you think of cannot involve technology! No iPads, Laptops, Mobile Technologies. Nothing ‘techie’ what so ever! I can surely say that this threw me! Not an easy task! We had time to think about this, share this with our team, and share this with the rest of the GTA team! A great question to have a think about yourself! The answers that were shared by the GTC’s were amazing! Topics ranging from Learning Design Spaces, to the workings of the Human Brain and it’s development and understandings to the thinking curriculum! Many and varied answers, just what you’d expect from so many varied educators!

If i were continue down the path of telling you all that i’d learnt and what i’d gotten from attending the GTA, we’d both be here for some while. I will finish with this, and that being, attending the GTA for 2011 was a learning¬†opportunity that i will never forget. The tools, resources, people and setting all made for such a remarkable day.

Thank you to all those who attended to help make this such a great¬†professional¬†learning experience. For those who’ve ever though about becoming a GTA, those who’ve never thought about becoming a GTA, or those simply interested in Google and what it has to offer, i encourage you to complete the¬†application¬†process and join this great community of educators who have a passion for learning!

One last thought or statement which came from GTA and a great one at that:

Screen shot 2011-04-24 at 6.52.27 PM

0

Google & GTA 2011

google1

This year i was luckily enough to be selected to part of the Google Teacher Academy (GTA) for 2011. I will be honest and say that I was quite ‘chuffed’ when i was informed of being chosen to be part of this amazing group of people and this wonderful learning experience!

I think, more so believe, that Google is a¬†resource¬†that is¬†massively¬†undervalued as an educational tool. The App’s that Google offers educators to assist teaching and learning highly out weigh a lot of what is already on offer out there in the World Wide Web!

So… what i would like to share are a few links and resources that i have come across in my time, mostly from having a great PLN, ¬†that i have found to be both useful and practical.¬†Resources¬†that have assisted me in delivering specific content to my students and tools which have helped me with my teaching. I hope you find them useful.

1. Google for Educators. The official Google for education site. Here you will find excellent tools for your classroom including activities and posters to display, information on becoming part of the Google Teacher Academy and how you can become part of the Google Teacher Academy.

2. Google App’s for Education. The applications on offer from Google to be used in the classroom offer educators and students free and¬†customizable¬†tools that allow students to work more collaboratively and with greater ease. This is a path that i have gone down with my own College. One app, gMail, Google’s email application, offer schools up to 900 free gmail accounts, each with¬†approx.¬†7.5 GB of online storage! A massive amount!

3.¬†K-12 Guide to going Google. This links will give you tools and guidelines to assist you in getting your schools, teachers and students up and running regarding using all things Google App’s. A very helpful site!

4. 100+ Google Tricks that will save you time in School. What’s not to love about a title like that? Here you’ll find tips on everything from using Google Docs to Search Tricks to Google Books.

5. The Google Classroom. As this site states, “Google has not only taken over the world, but they are positioned to take over many of the classrooms!” There are great links here for everything Google and Education. Just follow the links.

6. Google Sites. The Quick and Easy way to create your own website, on anything, for free! Excellent alternative for a wiki or blog if you’re after something more in depth.

7. Google Earth. Sure, we’ve heard of it. I will be money that one of the first things you did on it was look for your house. Maybe used it for directions or looked for a famous landmark. But… it can be used for so much more…

8. Google Tools for Schools: Google Earth. An outstanding resource which will help you embed such a great application to your teaching and learning programs!

9. Google Earth World History Tours. This Wikispace gives you acces to specifically created Google Earth Files that trace the footsteps of some of the greatest events and people in¬†mankind’s¬†history. A classic example of someone taking a tool such as Google Earth and utilising its features for teaching and learning purposes.

10. Google Public Data¬†Explorer. Here you’ll find excellent public data that Google has sourced and placed here for you to utilise and explore. Things ranging from European unemployment by country, road transport figures, global broadband performance, US Population and many more. Great classroom discussions can be had from the data sets given here. Well worth a look.

And last but not least…

11. Google Reader. I felt as though i was somewhat blind and deaf for not having seen or heard of ¬†Google Reader before! For those who have a gMail account, Google Reader allows you to suscribe to specific blogs and websites that you love to get information and happenings from. I can hear the sceptic saying, but i suscribe anyway and get email alerts when a new post or blog is updated… Correct. BUT… Google reader allows you to collect all of these updates in one place, with out the need to visit all of the countless blogs, news related sites and the like you may follow. A great tool for making life in the technical world… easier!